Cost of Using a Surrogate

Total Costs: $50,000 – $100,000+

Let’s just say it: Surrogacy is not cheap. And when you think about the human costs and complications involved in delivering a child, it makes sense. First, there is simply the strange feeling of exchanging money for such a physical, emotional act – on both sides. There are also little things that can affect anyone’s life over a period of a year or more. Whether they cost money or not, they are important to acknowledge and be aware of as supportive expectant parents. Since your surrogate will not only carry your child for 9 months, but also submit to any medications and preparations involved in the IVF process, she is agreeing to at least a year of preparation and pregnancy. That’s why it is important for you, your surrogate, and your agency to be open and honest with each other, considerate to the needs of all involved, and sensitive to the feelings of all parties. It’s best to have every option outlined in advance and agreed upon by you, your surrogate, your attorney(s), and your agency, if applicable.

Surrogate Compensation: $10,000 – $30,000

Monthly allowance for surrogate: $200 – $400/mo (Covers travel to and from appointments, other misc. costs)

Embryo Transfer Fee: Surrogate will receive money for each embryo transferred in IVF process, usually around $500

Medications: You may pay a surrogate when she begins injectable medications for IVF

Travel Expenses: $600 – $6,000 (Depending on how far she has to travel)

Legal Costs:

Contract review: $1,000

Life insurance policy for surrogate: $350 – $500 annually

Legal fees: $7,500 (parental right court pleadings, surrogate pleadings, legal representation, and filing fees)

Psychological Evaluation of Surrogate: $1,000

Psychological Counseling: $1,000

Account management costs: Depends. Cost of managing financial transactions between surrogate and intended parents

Lost wages compensation: Depends. Cost of any lost wages incurred by surrogate

Prenatal tests, visits, delivery (if surrogate not covered by insurance): $10,000

Other potential costs:

  • Maternity clothes
  • Prenatal vitamins
  • Living expenses
  • Childcare (if surrogate has other children)
  • Medical procedure fees (c-section, tests, miscarriage, etc.)
  • Twins (Surrogate may receive more money, depending on agency/your agreement)
  • Breast Milk Pumping (equipment, milk transfer)

Sources: http://www.creatingfamilies.com/SM/SM_Info.aspx?Type=123

http://adopting.adoption.com/child/surrogacy.html

6 Comments

  1. Kendra, thanks for posting this great overview. This is a really clear and concise outline of costs related to surrogacy. We’ve found that as well as having a good understanding of estimated costs, intended parents should educate themselves about opportunities for financing and insurance. Check out some of our tips for covering the cost of surrogacy over at our blog: http://bit.ly/R4oiRz

    Reply
  2. Clark says:

    The process of carrying a child for 9 months builds a bond, even when the person carrying is a surrogate. There needs to be proper coordination between the intended parents and their surrogates to facilitate the entire process. Want to know more about surrogacy options? Visit http://www.growinggenerations.com and learn how this surrogacy and egg donation agency is catering to the needs of people who want to be parents but are constrained in one way or another.

    Reply
  3. Elisa says:

    I am interested in becoming a surrogate. Where can I get more information?

    Reply
  4. Kim says:

    I am 43 years old and would love to be a surrogate….AGAIN! I did this for a friend in 2012 and carried twins for her. It has been the most amazing experience I have had the pleasure in doing. I know I’m a bit older, but I am healthy. Is there a chance for me to do this again soon?

    Kim

    Reply

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